The History of Retailing and Consumption

Series editor: Gareth Shaw, University of Exeter, UK

The History of Retailing and Consumption

Cover images from selected titles in this series

Books in The History of Retailing and Consumption
  • It is increasingly recognised that retail distribution systems and changes in consumption play crucial roles in the development and societal structure of economies.

    Since the series was launched, interest in retail history and in the changing patterns of consumption has continued to grow. Such growth has involved ever wider perspectives on the importance of retailing and consumption in terms of the time periods examined and across different societies, along with comparative studies. In addition the nature of consumption processes have been opened up to much more critical examination, all of which has come from a wide range of disciplines. The aim of this multi-disciplinary series is to provide an international forum for publications that research and explore key themes within the history of retailing and consumption.
  • For more information on how to submit a book proposal to the series, please contact Emily Yates, at eyates@ashgatepublishing.com.
    •  Gareth Shaw
      Gareth Shaw
  • Series editor, Gareth Shaw, explains the background to the series:
    ‘Having spent a good deal of my career working on various aspects of retail history it became increasingly obvious that there were very few publication outlets for high quality monographs. Many of the established historical series tended to show little interest in anything directly on retailing, shopping and consumption. At the same time from the mid-1980s onwards there was an increasing interest and presence of researchers at all levels examining different aspects of retail change, related aspects of consumer consumption and shopping behaviour. During the 1990s such interests became increasingly multi-disciplinary as cultural historians, economic and business historians together with historical geographers and those interested in the history of marketing all began to focus attention on aspects of retailing. It was from such interests that the idea for the Ashgate series emerged. In my opinion it clearly reflects the research progress along with the growing interests in the history of retailing and consumption.’